Year PLANTS (Million kWh)
 Da Siat Da Dang 2 Da M’bri Total
2011  64.660 160.589     
2012  67.054 173.000     
2013  64.262 197.548     
2014 69.818 214.592    378.459 662,869

2015

63.753 169.608    357.788 591,149

2016

64.004  154.27  339.546 557,820

2017

76.467 225.941   405.949 708.357

2018

73.587 196.104 366.839 636.530

2019

64.535 177.243 342.231 584.009

2020

61.855 183.735 188.620 434.210

9/2021

46.262 124.504 257.927 428.693

                                  REVENUE

Year

PLANT (Billion VND)

Da Siat

Da Dâng 2

Da M'bri

Total

2011

47.982

107.459

 

155.441

2012

58.188

118.972

 

177.160

2013

59.311

134.784

 

194.095

2014

62.268

157.738

376.437

596.443

2015

68.595

 128.761 

393.504 

590.860

2016

 68.194 

  115.971

329.465

 513.630

2017

82.453

166.863

374.371

623.687

2018

82.3

162

376

620.3

2019

76.917

159.411

406.700

643.028

2020

76.396

144.140

208.546

429.082

9/2021

56.941

98.791

285.505

441.237

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France: Wind Energy Is a Solution in Energy Transition

05/05/2014

France may be the world’s most nuclear energy dependent country, but times are changing. When French President François Hollande took the reins of power in 2012 he pledged to reduce the country’s nuclear dependency from 75 percent to 50 percent by 2025.

wind-turbine-wind-farm.jpg

 

Today, France has a goal of reaching 19 GW of wind energy by 2020, up from its current level of 8.2 GW, according to the European Wind Energy Association’s (EWEA) latest statistics. This will significantly raise the percentage of wind powered electricity in the country from the 3% wind covers today. And, according to a very recent survey, the French are behind this transition.

Some 64 percent of French people see wind energy as a solution, among others, in the context of the energy transition, says a CSA survey published in March 2014. Moreover, 80 percent of the 1010 respondents consider it necessary to invest in wind without waiting for the traditional power plants to reach the end of their lifecycle.

65 percent of those surveyed said that they would invest in renewable energy (wind and solar/photovoltaic) today if they had to personally invest in one energy source, while 15 percent chose nuclear, 7 percent chose gas and 1 percent chose coal. Meanwhile, 69 percent of French people would choose wind energy if they had to choose one energy type to be constructed in their region. 75 percent chose solar, 21 percent chose nuclear, 16 percent chose gas and 4 percent chose gas.

In short, the results show that the French are aware that an energy transition must take place, they are confident enough in renewables to invest if they could, and they know that the time to act is now. Next year is a key year for energy decision-makers in France since both the UN summit on climate change will take place in Paris, and, just two weeks before, EWEA will host is internationally-renowned annual event EWEA 2015 from 17-20 November in the same city. The event is set to be a platform for the wind energy industry to make its climate-friendly technology solutions known to global leaders at the UN summit.

France’s opinions on wind power sit well with Europe-wide opinion polls on wind energy, as detailed by EWEA. EWEA believes that wind energy delivers a multitude of benefits to communities from sustainable jobs and economic revival, to fighting climate change and bolstering energy security. On a local level, renting out land for wind farms can provide income, and taxes from a wind energy business can be used by the local community to improve infrastructure and services — all of which contribute to the public’s strong perception of wind power.

The results in France echo other public opinion surveys in the country: In 2011 an ADEME opinion poll found that 80 percent of French people back the installation of wind turbines. In 2013 an IPSOS survey found that wind power had a good image for 83 percent of the population. The same survey found that 80 percent of interviewees would welcome wind turbines in their region (départment) while 68 percent would welcome turbines in their local area (commune). And, according to France Energie Eolienne, public opinion becomes more favourable the closer the respondent lives to a wind farm.