Year PLANTS (Million kWh)
 Da Siat Da Dang 2 Da M’bri Total
2011  64.660 160.589     
2012  67.054 173.000     
2013  64.262 197.548     
2014 69.818 214.592    378.459 662,869

2015

63.753 169.608    357.788 591,149

2016

64.004  154.27  339.546 557,820

2017

76.467 225.941   405.949 708.357

2018

73.587 196.104 366.839 636.530

2019

64.535 177.243 342.231 584.009

2020

61.855 183.735 188.620 434.210

9/2021

46.262 124.504 257.927 428.693

                                  REVENUE

Year

PLANT (Billion VND)

Da Siat

Da Dâng 2

Da M'bri

Total

2011

47.982

107.459

 

155.441

2012

58.188

118.972

 

177.160

2013

59.311

134.784

 

194.095

2014

62.268

157.738

376.437

596.443

2015

68.595

 128.761 

393.504 

590.860

2016

 68.194 

  115.971

329.465

 513.630

2017

82.453

166.863

374.371

623.687

2018

82.3

162

376

620.3

2019

76.917

159.411

406.700

643.028

2020

76.396

144.140

208.546

429.082

9/2021

56.941

98.791

285.505

441.237

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Schottel completes full-scale test of marine turbine in Strangford Lough

27/10/2014

German marine propulsion manufacturer Schottel has announced successful tests of a full-scale hydrokinetic turbine in Northern Ireland's Strangford Lough.

The tests include 260 hours of operation in real-world conditions and showed that a single turbine with a rotor diameter of four meters can generate 50 kW per second at a rated water velocity of 2.75 meters per second. The company said 10 hours of operation provides enough electricity to power an average household for a month.

Schottel attached the turbine to a moored barge, mounting it on a lifting frame at the stern and lowering it into the operating position for testing.

"The turbine shaft rotations, torque and power output were recorded for use in the performance assessment," the company said in a statement. "Load cells measured the resulting thrust force, while detailed measurements of flow conditions were also taken."

Testing methods were developed in accordance to standards established by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and represent the first scientifically monitored evaluation of a Schotttel turbine. The Strangford Lough tests were reviewed by the Marine Research Group at Queens University of Belfast, supported by the European MARINET program.

"We greatly enjoyed these fruitful co-operations," Schottel research engineer Dr. Ralf Starzmann said. "We already tested our turbine under lab conditions and with another sea test, but this time the testing conditions were certainly perfect and most realistic."

The company said the turbines can be equipped with rotor diameters between three and five meters, with applications in rivers, sea straits, and tidal races on jetty, floating or submerged platforms.

"Our turbines are based on the fact that reducing turbine size leads to a better ratio of powert and material use," Starzmann said. "They produce grid-ready electric power and are individually adaptable."

The company announced in July that its subsidiary, Black Rock Tidal Power Inc., had plans to install a 2.5 MW ocean power demonstration berth in Canada's Bay of Fundy.