Year PLANTS (Million kWh)
 Da Siat Da Dang 2 Da M’bri Total
2011  64.660 160.589     
2012  67.054 173.000     
2013  64.262 197.548     
2014 69.818 214.592    378.459 662,869

2015

63.753 169.608    357.788 591,149

2016

64.004  154.27  339.546 557,820

2017

76.467 225.941   405.949 708.357

2018

73.587 196.104 366.839 636.530

2019

64.535 177.243 342.231 584.009

2020

61.855 183.735 188.620 434.210

9/2021

46.262 124.504 257.927 428.693

                                  REVENUE

Year

PLANT (Billion VND)

Da Siat

Da Dâng 2

Da M'bri

Total

2011

47.982

107.459

 

155.441

2012

58.188

118.972

 

177.160

2013

59.311

134.784

 

194.095

2014

62.268

157.738

376.437

596.443

2015

68.595

 128.761 

393.504 

590.860

2016

 68.194 

  115.971

329.465

 513.630

2017

82.453

166.863

374.371

623.687

2018

82.3

162

376

620.3

2019

76.917

159.411

406.700

643.028

2020

76.396

144.140

208.546

429.082

9/2021

56.941

98.791

285.505

441.237

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Wind power is cheapest energy, EU analysis finds

27/10/2014

Onshore windfarms far cheaper than coal and gas when health impacts are factored in, report shows

Whitlee wind farm south of Glasgow. Onshore wind costs around €105 per megawatt hour when externalities are considered, according to Ecofys. Photograph: Global Warming Images/REX/Global Warming Images/REX

Onshore wind is cheaper than coal, gas or nuclear energy when the costs of ‘external’ factors like air quality, human toxicity and climate change are taken into account, according to an EU analysis.

The report says that for every megawatt hour (MW/h) of electricity generated, onshore wind costs roughly €105 (£83) per MW/h, compared to gas and coal which can cost up to around €164 and €233 per MW/h, respectively.

Nuclear power, offshore wind and solar energy are all comparably inexpensive generators, at roughly €125 per MW/h.

“This report highlights the true cost of Europe’s dependence on fossil fuels,” said Justin Wilkes, the deputy CEO of the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). “Renewables are regularly denigrated for being too expensive and a drain on the taxpayer. Not only does the commission’s report show the alarming cost of coal but it also presents onshore wind as both cheaper and more environmentally-friendly.”

The paper, which was written for the European commission by the Ecofys consultancy, suggests that the Conservative party plan of restricting new onshore windfarms will mean blocking out the cheapest source of energy when environmental and health facts are taken into consideration. It has been suggested the Tory plan could be done through a cap on onshore wind turbines’ output, lower subsidies or tighter planning restrictions.

“Any plans to change policy for onshore wind must be looked at in the context of this report,” said Oliver Joy a spokesman for EWEA. “Investors need long-term visibility. ‘Stop-start’ policies as well as harsh retroactive changes can blindside investors, driving up the risk premium and cost of capital.”

The documents’ contents may also be unwelcome in some quarters of the commission, which early today published selective results from it that did not include external health and pollution costs.

These showed that renewable energy took €38.3bn of public subsidies in 2012, compared to €22.3bn for gas, coal and nuclear. The EU did however note that if free carbon allowances to polluters were included in the data, it “would reduce the gap between support for renewables and other power generation technologies.”

The Ecofys paper’s nuanced evaluation of historical subsidies for coal and nuclear was also not mentioned in the EU press release, which renewable energy associations linked to a fossil fuel lobbying effort ahead of the report’s publication.

“Despite decades of heavy subsidies, mature coal and nuclear energy technologies are still dependent on similar levels of public support as innovative solar energy is receiving today,” Frauke Thies, the policy director for the European Photovoltaic Industry Association told the Guardian.

“The difference is that costs of solar continue to decrease rapidly. If the unaccounted external costs to society are included, the report demonstrates that support to fossil fuels and nuclear even by far exceeds that to solar.”

The EU’s energy commissioner, Gunther Oettinger, said that the report was only “a first step” to filling gaps in knowledge about the nature of energy subsidies and more reports are likely in the months ahead.

The figures for the energy sources in the report are all approximate, as the bar chart listing them is counted in units of €25 MW/h.

Last year, a row broke out in Brussels after the German newspaper Suddeutche Zeitung reported that Oettinger had tried to delete figures cited in a commission report showing that in 2011, fossil fuels took €26bn in public subsidies, compared to €35bn for nuclear power and €30bn for renewables.

By Arthur Neslen (theguardian.com)

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